Increasing liberalisation boosts freedom of aviation industry

The industry can expect far more freedom in the skies within the next 15 years under increasing liberalisation. Giving a talk at this year’s Routes Europe in Kraków, Poland, entitled 'Route Development in 2030: How Regulation Will Affect Your Deals', Watson Farley & Williams LLP partner, Jeremy Robinson, said he believes legislation will become increasingly liberal.

The industry can expect far more freedom in the skies within the next 15 years under increasing liberalisation. Giving a talk at this year’s Routes Europe in Kraków, Poland, entitled 'Route Development in 2030: How Regulation Will Affect Your Deals', Watson Farley & Williams LLP partner, Jeremy Robinson, said he believes legislation will become increasingly liberal.

But he urged the industry to start thinking now about how it can guarantee it is still sustainable as it encounters strong growth and added: “Once in 2030 you are likely to see more open skies and route development opportunities. It is up to you to define how you will grow the industry using sustainable techniques.”

In particular he argued airlines must consider how to better look after their customers and help them when they suffer problems, as opposed to waiting to be taken to court. Robinson also said the environment will still be a massive issue for the industry despite the current work to make aircraft greener. He argued any reductions in emissions from the new technologies will be offset by the predicted increase in the number of flyers.

He also again urged airlines and airports to look at how they can best share the risk of future route development with longer contracts of up to 10 years being a way of achieving this. Robinson also believed governments will become more liberal, so opening up new opportunities as they relax protectionist legislation.

He also urged both airlines and airports to continue working with unions for the benefit of all. However, Robinson admitted it was impossible to tell what would happen to one of the biggest problems when it comes to the Europe’s aviation industry.

“One of the biggest problems in Europe is congestion, congestion in the skies, which means it takes a lot longer to get to your destination and you burn more fuel," he said. “I don’t really have any information on that.”

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