Routes Europe 2020

The route development forum for Europe

Bergen, Norway

Conference Programme

Routes Europe will bring together a high-profile list of airline leaders to identify and discuss the biggest topics in the industry.

Day 1

Day 2

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    State of the European Industry

    The International Air Transport Association (IATA) has forecasted that Europe’s aviation market will grow at 2 percent per year over the next two decades and will add an additional 611 million passengers by 2037. This means the total market size will be 1.9 billion passengers. However, in recent months we have seen the demise of Thomas Cook, XL Airways, WOW air and Aigle Azur, while others have been forced to restructure their operations. Overcapacity, air traffic control strikes, growing trade disputes and geopolitical tensions are all playing their part.  What does the future hold for Europe’s aviation industry?

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    CEO Keynote Interview

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    European Aviation Challenges Panel Discussion

    Consolidation, Brexit, Slot Constraints...

    Despite the bullish growth forecasts for Europe’s aviation industry, the year so far has been characterised by ongoing uncertainty. Traffic growth has softened in recent months, likely because of uncertainty over the economic backdrop and Brexit. The UK’s exit from the European Union has been particularly unsettling and the effects of its departure are likely to be felt for some time to come. Consolidation also continues to be a theme, although the rate the landscape is changing remains slow. Over the past 12 months we have also continued to witness further disparity between the strong and weak carriers. Since Routes Europe took place in Hanover, the likes of Thomas Cook, XL Airways and Aigle Azur have disappeared from our skies and others are no doubt under pressure. This panel session will explore the biggest challenges facing European carriers and look at how airlines and airports are responding. 

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    The Rise of the East Panel Discussion

    The incredible growth in Asian markets and outbound travel from China are having a profound impact on how European carriers aim to service new route opportunities from East to West.

    Finnair and Helsinki Airport have been connecting the regions for 35 years while Hungarian low-cost carrier Wizz Air’s stated strategy is linking Central and Eastern Europe destinations with Western Europe, primarily from secondary airports.

    The move west forms part of Wizz’s desire to gain further market share from low-cost rivals. One of the airline’s big advantages is that Hungary has some of the lowest labour costs in the EU. Given the scale of its ambition, expect Wizz to open further Western Europe bases in the coming months as it continues to launch an assault on sectors previously dominated by Ryanair and easyJet.

    Air Astana and its partner Lufthansa are now the only airlines operating nonstop flights from Kazakhstan to Western Europe, but several Eastern European airlines compete aggressively in this market with a one-stop product.

    Aeroflot and the Gulf carriers are also in pole position to connect the two growing aviation powerhouses, while more fuel efficient equipment opens up routes previously viewed as unsustainably thin.

Day 3

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    Airline Briefing

    Exclusive updates direct from key airline decision makers and network planners.

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    Airline Briefing

    Exclusive updates direct from key airline decision makers and network planners.

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    Airline Briefing

    Exclusive updates direct from key airline decision makers and network planners.

* Please note like all events, the programme is subject to change.