Routes Europe 2020

The route development forum for Europe

Bergen, Norway
27 - 29 April 2020

Conference Programme

Routes Europe will bring together a high-profile list of airline leaders to identify and discuss the biggest topics in the industry.

Monday, 27 April 2020

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    Welcome to Bergen

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    Keynote Address

    What does a more sustainable aviation industry look like?

    While the demand for air travel continues to rise, calls to curb flying for environmental reasons are also growing. In recent years we have all heard of “flygskam” – the Swedish word which translates as “flight shame”. The anti-flying movement encourages people to stop taking flights to lower carbon emissions. Although the aviation industry contributes only a small percentage to the worldwide total, the movement has brought the industry’s environmental impact into sharp focus. So how are airlines and airports tackling the issue? What does a more sustainable aviation industry look like?

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    Case Study

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    Airline CEO Heavyweights

    How are Airlines Tackling the Sustainability Issue?

    Airlines have cut average emissions per passenger journey in half compared with 1990 and the wider industry has committed to reducing total emissions to half the 2005 level by 2050. Many European carriers are leading the way when it comes to investing in more fuel-efficient aircraft, as well as improving the efficiency of their existing operations, carbon offsetting, and exploring the use of sustainable aviation fuels. Our airline CEO heavyweights will reveal their thoughts on the sustainability issue and what needs to happen if the ambitious environmental targets are to be met.

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    Ask the Airline CEO Heavyweights

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    Electrification of Aviation Panel Discussion

    Latest Advancements in Hybrid and Electric Aircraft

    British airline easyJet and European aircraft manufacturer Airbus recently outlined plans to jointly assess the potential of hybrid and electric aircraft for short-haul flights. The research project aims to assess the impacts and the requirements necessary for the large-scale introduction of next generation sustainable aircraft. SAS is also working with Airbus to establish the requirements for the next generation of sustainable aircraft. This panel will discuss the latest advancements in hybrid and electric aircraft – and what needs to happen for them to become a reality at airports across Europe.  

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    Jet Biofuel Panel Discussion

    Sustainable Aviation Fuels (SAF)

    Sustainable aviation fuel, which is derived from oil crops, will be key if the industry is to meet its ambitious carbon emissions reduction goals. However, production is currently limited as the higher cost is preventing wider uptake. So how can we accelerate the growth of SAF? Are governments doing enough to support the use of alternative jet fuels?

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    Communication Marketing

    How you get the message across?

    Although the aviation industry is responsible for just 2.5 percent of global CO2 emissions, it has rightly acknowledged its impact on the planet. It has therefore made great strides to reduce emissions in recent years and is working hard to create a more sustainable future. However, with environmental campaigners like Greta Thunberg and Extinction Rebellion leading the flight shaming movement, is the industry being pro-active enough in communicating its sustainability focus, as well as the economic and social benefits of aviation? How can airlines, airports and destinations get the message across?

Tuesday, 28 April 2020

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    State of the European Industry

    The International Air Transport Association (IATA) has forecasted that Europe’s aviation market will grow at 2 percent per year over the next two decades and will add an additional 611 million passengers by 2037. This means the total market size will be 1.9 billion passengers. However, in recent months we have seen the demise of Thomas Cook, XL Airways, WOW air and Aigle Azur, while others have been forced to restructure their operations. Overcapacity, air traffic control strikes, growing trade disputes and geopolitical tensions are all playing their part.  What does the future hold for Europe’s aviation industry?

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    Case Study

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    European Aviation Challenges Panel Discussion

    Consolidation, Brexit, Slot Constraints...

    Despite the bullish growth forecasts for Europe’s aviation industry, the year so far has been characterised by ongoing uncertainty. Traffic growth has softened in recent months, likely because of uncertainty over the economic backdrop and Brexit. The UK’s exit from the European Union has been particularly unsettling and the effects of its departure are likely to be felt for some time to come. Consolidation also continues to be a theme, although the rate the landscape is changing remains slow. Over the past 12 months we have also continued to witness further disparity between the strong and weak carriers. Since Routes Europe took place in Hanover, the likes of Thomas Cook, XL Airways and Aigle Azur have disappeared from our skies and others are no doubt under pressure. This panel session will explore the biggest challenges facing European carriers and look at how airlines and airports are responding. 

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    The Rise of the East Panel Discussion

    The incredible growth in Asian markets and outbound travel from China are having a profound impact on how European carriers aim to service new route opportunities from East to West.

    Finnair and Helsinki Airport have been connecting the regions for 35 years while Hungarian low-cost carrier Wizz Air’s stated strategy is linking Central and Eastern Europe destinations with Western Europe, primarily from secondary airports.

    The move west forms part of Wizz’s desire to gain further market share from low-cost rivals. One of the airline’s big advantages is that Hungary has some of the lowest labour costs in the EU. Given the scale of its ambition, expect Wizz to open further Western Europe bases in the coming months as it continues to launch an assault on sectors previously dominated by Ryanair and easyJet.

    Air Astana and its partner Lufthansa are now the only airlines operating nonstop flights from Kazakhstan to Western Europe, but several Eastern European airlines compete aggressively in this market with a one-stop product.

    Aeroflot and the Gulf carriers are also in pole position to connect the two growing aviation powerhouses, while more fuel efficient equipment opens up routes previously viewed as unsustainably thin.

Wednesday, 29 April 2020

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    Airline Briefing

    Exclusive updates direct from key airline decision makers and network planners.

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    Airline Briefing

    Exclusive updates direct from key airline decision makers and network planners.

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    Airline Briefing

    Exclusive updates direct from key airline decision makers and network planners.

* Please note like all events, the programme is subject to change.